Mammut and The North Face need to stop using toxic chemicals

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Mammut and The North Face need to stop using toxic chemicals

High performance outdoor gear is a big business which is built around the idea of respecting nature. Yet Mammut and The North Face knowingly release hazardous chemicals into the environment when they manufacture their products.

Greenpeace tested Mammut and The North Face products and found them to contain PFCs; hazardous chemicals used to make outdoor gear waterproof and dirt resistant.

Once released into the environment, PFCs persist for many years and future generations will continue to be exposed to contaminated water, air and food.

PFC-free gear already exists: safer, more sustainable water-proofing membranes and treatments are possible.

Hikers, athletes, nature lovers: Tell the CEOs of Mammut and The North Face to walk their outdoor talk and stop using toxic chemicals.

What are PFCs?

Per and polyfluorinated chemicals are a family of man-made, fluorine-containing chemicals with unique properties to make materials stain resistant and waterproof. PFCs are incredibly resistant to breakdown; some have the potential to remain in the environment for hundreds of years after being released.

They are turning up in unexpected places around the world. These pollutants have been found in secluded mountain lakes and snow, they’ve been discovered in the livers of polar bears in the Arctic and even in human blood.

LEARN MORE ABOUT PFCS, WHERE THEY COME FROM AND WHY THEY SHOULD NOT BE USED IN THE PRODUCTION OF OUTDOOR GEAR

What are PFCs?

PFCs are chemical molecules released by industry during the production of water resistant outdoor gear like jackets or tents. Their unique properties are used to make materials stain resistant and waterproof.

And why should I care?

Studies show that PFCs impact the reproductive and immune system. They are also potentially carcinogenic.

Are there any health risks if I wear a jacket containing PFCs?

PFCs are not known to go directly through the skin and there is no evidence of direct health risks from wearing clothes containing PFCs. The chemicals are released into the environment during the textile’s manufacture, as well as when they’re washed and disposed of. PFCs can enter our bodies when we breathe contaminated air or when we ingest food, drink water, or through exposure to house dust containing PFCs.

ALRIGHT… WHAT CAN I DO ABOUT IT?

Tell outdoor brands that they need to stop using PFCs now, and start using alternatives, by sending them an email or asking them on their Facebook or Twitter accounts.

Since outdoor brands rely on nature for their marketing, they should be the first ones to eliminate PFCs and set an example for other industries to follow.